High School Responds To Student's Prank By Asking Local Law Enforcement To Step In And Investigate

from the now-who's-acting-like-a-child? dept

I see we’re still handling things stupidly when it comes to school disciplinary problems. For years now, many schools have been steadily abdicating their responsibilities, allowing in-school law enforcement (commonly called “School Resource Officers”) to hand out discipline that school administrators used to handle themselves.

This hasn’t worked out well for students. It has turned standard discipline problems into police matters and given students a head start on having their futures ruined for juvenile (in all senses of the word) mistakes.

Recently, a high school in Glastonbury, Connecticut was horrified to find it had been pranked. The Hartford Courant’s first pass at the breaking news opened with this:

An inappropriate quote has halted distribution of Glastonbury High School’s 2021 yearbooks and police have been called to investigate, the principal confirmed Monday.

How does an “inappropriate quote” become the subject of a police investigation? The rest of the reporting didn’t explain. Neither did school administrators. But they did hint it had something to do with bullying.

A student using a false name submitted the quote printed in the yearbook, which was being distributed, Principal Nancy Bean wrote to students and parents on Friday.

Bean would not describe the quote, but she wrote, “We are saddened and distressed by what happened. Acts of bias, bullying and cruelty are not acceptable at our school. We are committed to ensuring all Glastonbury High School students feel safe and supported.”

While it may have been possible some sort of stalking or harassment was taking place that might have merited a law enforcement response, the principal’s explanation that the quote had been “submitted” by a student using a fake name suggested nothing more than a bored student taking the high school for a ride.

Later reporting filled in more details. But it still didn’t explain why the school felt compelled to involve the police. Nor did it explain why the police felt compelled to remain involved.

A quote by Adolf Hitler inserted into Glastonbury High School’s 2021 yearbooks has halted distribution of the yearbook and police have been called to investigate.

A student using a false name submitted the quote printed in the yearbook, which was being distributed, Principal Nancy Bean wrote to students and parents on Friday. The quote under a student’s photo was attributed to George Floyd, the Black man killed by police one year ago in Minnesota, a photo of the yearbook entry sent to The Courant Monday afternoon showed.

That it involved George Floyd’s name and Adolph Hitler’s words still doesn’t make it a crime. And, again, the principal said a student “submitted” the quote. Those vetting the yearbook before publication failed to catch it. A prank isn’t a crime, no matter how terrible it made administrators feel once they realized they’d been tricked into publishing (and distributing) a Hitler quote.

Since the original reporting, a few more details have come to light. And there’s still nothing that suggests a criminal act has occurred. It only suggests the school needs better editors and/or a more tightly-controlled submission system.

In an email to the school community, Glastonbury High School’s principal and the district’s superintendent said the quote — which appeared under a student’s photo — was submitted by a different student using a false name. They said they also uncovered an offensive quote glorifying war and an entry, which referenced the “Boston Bomber.” The district’s priority is supporting the students, who were victimized by this act.

Fast forward to a couple of days past the point of the original reporting and a new narrative is being developed, possibly to justify the involvement of law enforcement.

A letter released by the Glastonbury school superintendent said the student gained access to a computer system and submitted a quote from Adolf Hitler, but falsely attributed the message to George Floyd.

“Gained access.” That’s incredibly vague. If a student had hacked a secure system or accessed administrative systems they had no authority to access, it might be a crime. But only “might.” And only if prosecutors are willing to abuse badly-written laws to convert a prank into criminal charges.

The Glastonbury Police were a little more direct in the statement given to Newsweek:

“Although we find the quote to be disturbing, our criminal investigation is not focused on the content of the quote itself, but instead we are focused on investigating the unauthorized access of a computer system through which students submitted their quotes to be published in the yearbook.”

This still doesn’t explain anything. The official statement from the school superintendent makes no mention of unauthorized access. It also notes the student has already been punished by the school for this prank. All the letter says is the student used a fake name to submit fake quotes. That’s not illegal, no matter how embarrassed school officials feel. And this never would have been the end result if schools hadn’t become increasingly comfortable outsourcing their disciplinary problems.

Filed Under: , , , , , , , , , ,

Rate this comment as insightful
Rate this comment as funny
You have rated this comment as insightful
You have rated this comment as funny
Flag this comment as abusive/trolling/spam
You have flagged this comment
The first word has already been claimed
The last word has already been claimed
Insightful Lightbulb icon Funny Laughing icon Abusive/trolling/spam Flag icon Insightful badge Lightbulb icon Funny badge Laughing icon Comments icon

Comments on “High School Responds To Student's Prank By Asking Local Law Enforcement To Step In And Investigate”

Subscribe: RSS Leave a comment
21 Comments
Anonymoussays:

But think of the children

I expect that some form of "think of the children" to be evoked at some later press release.
As far as the "unauthorized access" bit… I think we’re all familiar enough with the typical law enforcement shenanigans to know that we’ll see some sort of… "because of the use of a ‘fake name’, the access to the system is considered ‘unauthorized’ and therefore not lawful"

if that doesn’t happen, It’ll be some other explanation as to why accessing an open computer system can somehow be "unauthorized".

TKnarrsays:

Re: But think of the children

And of course the question of whether the web site in question even had any authentication set up, or if it (like so many) simply assumed nobody would ever use anything other than their real name to submit a quote. As one judge has pointed out, "not desired" doesn’t equate to "unauthorized".

Anonymoussays:

This "access to a computer thing" makes me glad we didn’t have SROs when I was in school. At the time, everything I pulled on the school computer network was laughed at in the staff room when staff eventually found out, not outsourced to the local PD for appropriate punishment.

I think the librarian was annoyed at me for locking him out of his account (poor password choice) but the CS teacher was busy trying to keep a straight face when called in to discipline me on that one… and when I locked HIM out of his printer management system, he just sat me down and got me to show him how I’d done it, and how to fix it so it wouldn’t happen again.

These days, I guess those things would be federal crimes.

As for time bombing administration messages on the school’s computer network, or the various other pranks… well, nobody ever found out who did all that stuff, but I think they’d likely resort to using embarrassment as punishment.

iclaudiussays:

Re:

Doing that kind of thing (locking somebody out) at the bank (and later power utility) I worked at would get you fired instantly with no recourse, and I discourage kids from getting used to the idea that it’s just ‘fun’.

The matter referenced to in the article was not anything even approaching a crime as defined in the Federal USC.

Where were the idiots who approved the proofs before it was published? It should have been caught then. The kid is getting punished because the adults failed to do their job.

Lostinlodossays:

Reason is obvious, but not justified

It?s quite obvious we have two different things that happened.
A student gained unauthorised access to the school computer system. Which may be a computer crime.

A student used that access to create what could be construed as a hate crime.

I think the anti-police mentality is ignoring the issue here.
Given how schools are being attacked by everyone, I can?t blame administration for over reacting. Last thing a school wants is a hate crime lawsuit.
But this is the environment the media has spent the past few years creating and instigating.

Some poor kid is going to get their life turned inside out over CRT, BLM, SR, and a dozen other acronyms. All for a child?s childish prank.

I don?t doubt for a second if if the quote stolen was MLK it would have a different reaction.

Lostinlodossays:

Re:

? outside of GOP circles at any rate.?
You just had to make that lie didn?t you. White supremacy in the Republican Party is about the same level as Black supremacy in the Democrat party. They make up tiny outliers.

The reality is the school has a kid attaching Nazi comments to a recognisable black name in the current climate.

If they didn?t involve the police immediately they?d be open to hate crimes suits.

When they do what everyone says they should and take a stand against hate they are condemned for calling in the police. if they ignore the ?prank? their racist.
What would you have opted to do? Tanner Andrews?

Lostinlodossays:

Re: Re: Re:

And be thing about that is trump made the ?mistake? of talking to the grounded this is are, this is history, people of the country.

Every time someone breaks a statue, I consider it no different than Christians and Muslims burning books. The Chinese burning paintings. Etc

Despite what you think, there were non -racial people supporting the statues. And there were non violent people opposing them.

Destroying something because it offends is a short distance away from book burning and content bans.

They should be saved, moved to a public forum dedicated to history. Such as a museum or national memorial park.

And, I have no problem with them at battlefields.

We must remember. And we must fight to not bar for feelings.

Lostinlodossays:

Re: Re: Re:

And be thing about that is trump made the ‘mistake’ of talking to the grounded this is are, this is history, people of the country.

Every time someone breaks a statue, I consider it no different than Christians and Muslims burning books. The Chinese burning paintings. Etc

Despite what you think, there were non -racial people supporting the statues. And there were non violent people opposing them.

Destroying something because it offends is a short distance away from book burning and content bans.

They should be saved, moved to a public forum dedicated to history. Such as a museum or national memorial park.

And, I have no problem with them at battlefields.

We must remember. And we must fight to not bar for feelings.

Add Your Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here

Comment Options:

Make this the or (get credits or sign in to see balance) what's this?

What's this?

Techdirt community members with Techdirt Credits can spotlight a comment as either the "First Word" or "Last Word" on a particular comment thread. Credits can be purchased at the Techdirt Insider Shop »

Follow Techdirt

Techdirt Daily Newsletter

Techdirt Insider Discord
The latest chatter on the Techdirt Insider Discord channel...
Loading...
Older Stuff
13:40 It's Great That Winnie The Pooh Is In The Public Domain; But He Should Have Been Free In 1982 (Or Earlier) (35)
12:06 Norton 360 Now Comes With Crypto Mining Capabilities And Sketchy Removal Process (28)
10:45 Chinese Government Dragnet Now Folding In American Social Media Platforms To Silence Dissent (14)
10:40 Daily Deal: The 2022 Ultimate Cybersecurity Analyst Preparation Bundle (0)
09:29 A Fight Between Facebook And The British Medical Journal Highlights The Difficulty Of Moderating 'Medical Misinformation' (9)
06:29 Court Ruling Paves The Way For Better, More Reliable Wi-Fi (4)
20:12 Eighth Circuit (Again) Says There's Nothing Wrong With Detaining Innocent Minors At Gunpoint (15)
15:48 China's Regulatory War On Its Gaming Industry Racks Up 14k Casualties (10)
13:31 Chinese Government Fines Local Car Dealerships For Surveilling While Not Being The Government (5)
12:08 Eric Clapton Pretends To Regret The Decision To Sue Random German Woman Who Listed A Bootleg Of One Of His CDs On Ebay (29)
10:44 ICE Is So Toxic That The DHS's Investigative Wing Is Asking To Be Completely Separated From It (29)
10:39 Daily Deal: The 2022 Complete Raspberry Pi And Arduino Developer Bundle (0)
09:31 Google Blocked An Article About Police From The Intercept... Because The Title Included A Phrase That Was Also A Movie Title (24)
06:22 Wireless Carriers Balk At FAA Demand For 5G Deployment Delays Amid Shaky Safety Concerns (16)
19:53 Tenth Circuit Denies Qualified Immunity To Social Worker Who Fabricated A Mother's Confession Of Child Abuse (35)
15:39 Sci-Hub's Creator Thinks Academic Publishers, Not Her Site, Are The Real Threat To Science, And Says: 'Any Law Against Knowledge Is Fundamentally Unjust' (34)
13:32 Federal Court Tells Proud Boys Defendants That Raiding The Capitol Building Isn't Covered By The First Amendment (25)
12:14 US Courts Realizing They Have A Judge Alan Albright Sized Problem In Waco (17)
10:44 Boston Police Department Used Forfeiture Funds To Hide Purchase Of Surveillance Tech From City Reps (16)
10:39 Daily Deal: The Ultimate Microsoft Excel Training Bundle (0)
09:20 NY Senator Proposes Ridiculously Unconstitutional Social Media Law That Is The Mirror Opposite Of Equally Unconstitutional Laws In Florida & Texas (25)
06:12 Telecom Monopolies Are Exploiting Crappy U.S. Broadband Maps To Block Community Broadband Grant Requests (7)
12:00 Funniest/Most Insightful Comments Of 2021 At Techdirt (17)
10:00 Gaming Like It's 1926: Join The Fourth Annual Public Domain Game Jam (6)
09:00 New Year's Message: The Arc Of The Moral Universe Is A Twisty Path (33)
19:39 DHS, ICE Begin Body Camera Pilot Program With Surprisingly Good Policies In Place (7)
15:29 Remembering Techdirt Contributors Sherwin And Elliot (1)
13:32 DC Metro PD's Powerful Review Panel Keeps Giving Bad Cops Their Jobs Back (6)
12:11 Missouri Governor Still Expects Journalists To Be Prosecuted For Showing How His Admin Leaked Teacher Social Security Numbers (39)
10:48 Oversight Board Overturning Instagram Takedown Of Ayahuasca Post Demonstrates The Impossibility Of Content Moderation (10)
More arrow
This site, like most other sites on the web, uses cookies. For more information, see our privacy policy. Got it