DailyDirt: Crowds In Spaaaace...

from the urls-we-dig-up dept

Exploring the vastness of space isn't cheap, but it's becoming more accessible as the cost of satellites comes down slowly and data from telescopes is shared widely and freely. Citizen scientists can help advance astronomy in a variety of ways, donating time and/or money to projects that need more help. NASA's budget isn't exactly huge (compared to other parts of the national budget), so space scientists need all the help they can get. Here are just a few links on the wisdom of the crowd contributing to space exploration. If you'd like to read more awesome and interesting stuff, check out this unrelated (but not entirely random!) Techdirt post via StumbleUpon.
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Filed Under: astronomy, citizen scientists, crowdfunding, crowdsourcing, diy space, isee-3, kbo, kuiper belt objects, mars, new horizons, satellite, space exploration, spacecraft
Companies: nasa


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  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 3 Jun 2014 @ 10:56pm

    Can nasa solicit crowdfunding?

    Maybe if NASA could do its own kickstarter, it might be able to get a man on the moon again.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Lawrence D’Oliveiro, 4 Jun 2014 @ 1:23am

    I Wonder What Kind Of Encryption NASA Used...

    How does NASA prevent random people from sending unauthorized signals to its spacecraft? Especially old ones like this, and the Pioneer and Voyager probes—nobody had strong encryption back then, certainly nothing that would still be considered strong today. So what’s to prevent someone from taking them over?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      node (profile), 4 Jun 2014 @ 2:23am

      Re: I Wonder What Kind Of Encryption NASA Used...

      The arecibo radio telescope they used to make contact has a diameter of 1000f(300m), just a little large for my backyard. You need some pretty powerful radio transmitters to be able to reach out there. The money they are collecting goes into buying time on such equipment.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 4 Jun 2014 @ 11:35am

    No KBO candidates for New Horizons found yet...

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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