How Being More Open, Human And Awesome Can Save Anyone Worried About Making Money In Entertainment

from the make-it-happen dept

I've been pretty busy traveling and appearing at various conferences over the last month, including Midem, where I released our latest research report, The Sky is Rising!. I did so with a quick ten-minute presentation about both the state of the industry... as well as the fact that the challenges for anyone in the entertainment industry can be met by being more open, more human and (most of all) more awesome:
It's basically a follow-up presentation to my 2009 presentation, which introduced the Connect with Fans + Reason to Buy formula. Either way, it was fun to be back on the Midem stage, and I was thrilled with the overall response to the presentation. I heard from a lot of folks at the show about how much they liked it and how it gave them a good framework for building out their efforts as artists or as labels. It's always fun to be at Midem and talk to people on the ground about what they're seeing in the industry as well. Two years ago, I had thought that perhaps the industry had reached the bargaining stage, but I may have been wrong (or the five stages of grief aren't really applicable here). There wasn't nearly as much talk about "evil piracy" at this year's Midem... but there was plenty of lashing out about "evil Google" and how it was to blame for everything. If anything, it seemed to be a slip back into the "anger" stage. As we've explained time and time again, this anger seems entirely misdirected.

So it was nice to see so many people at Midem respond positively to my "totally positive" message about where some key opportunities were, by having them focus on how being more awesome to fans and treating them as human really has amazing results.

Separately, while I was at Midem I also did a much more technical "Midem Academy" session that was designed to be a hands-on interactive discussion about specific strategies for alternative business models that don't rely on copyright. That session was 50 minutes long and didn't have the same "entertainment" value, as I was told I had to use their limited Powerpoint format, rather than do my typical style (as seen above). Still, I quite enjoyed that discussion, and ended up spending almost as much time as we spent in the session talking to people and answering questions after the session. For some reason a lot of people were shy to ask questions to the whole group, but wanted to chat afterwards.
There was also a cool "open table" session I did at "Direct2Fan Camp" at Midem, where I got to talk with a bunch of folks who were interested in new business models. That was a lot of fun.

Finally, a couple weeks before that, I was in Washington DC for the Congressional Internet Caucus' State of the Net event, where there was a panel discussion/debate over SOPA, which was recently put online as well. That panel has myself and Steve Crocker (head of ICANN) talking about problems with SOPA/PIPA... and the MPAA's Paul Brigner and the US Chamber of Commerce's Steve Tepp defending SOPA. The panel may seem out-of-date, but it actually took place the day before the mass internet blackouts that effectively killed the bills. So, when this discussion happened, the bills (even in reduced form, without DNS issues) were still very much alive. At this point, the debate might be more interesting in a historical context, rather than a present one:
Either way the discussion was also fun (and, at times, a little heated). I also found it kind of amusing that we were told that there were to be no "opening speeches," and then everyone gave an opening speech. I don't know if it's a DC thing or what, but I had to create an "opening speech" on the fly, though I tried to keep it short.

Either way, it was great to meet many Techdirt community members around the globe at these various events as well, and I hope to see more of you at future events.
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Filed Under: awesome, human, louis ck, midem, open, sky is rising, techdirt feature


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  1. identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 15 Feb 2012 @ 6:36am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Third video

    Jay,

    first lesson: Techdirt is not a quotable source for facts. It's an opinion blog. Either quote the original source, or give up. We are discussing here that Mike is cherry picking facts, so pointing to his cherry picked facts as the truth is just not going to work out for you. Dig deeper, go back and look at his sources, compare, and you will see how the numbers got picked.

    " We have a 43.2% growth rate in indie content from 1998 to 2008"

    As well we should. The costs to produce content are way down, and many are willing to put all of their spare time in to creating content. Sadly, much of the creativity out there is in the remix area, so it's hard to say how much really new stuff is out there, and how much is a reworking of someone else's work product.

    Moreover, the numbers are meaningless if they don't add up to results. Mike was all up and excited a year or so ago when the number of "released" movies doubled. What he didn't want to talk about was that movie sales (dollars) are essentially flat, and ticket sales are dropping rapidly. Only massive increases in ticket prices have allowed the industry to stay at it's current level of income. So for the hundreds of indie films that got a release, they may have seen some income they might not have seen before, but overall, the industry isn't any strong, there isn't any more pie to distribute.

    "Also, I'm not seeing where a large amount of money is going to smaller numbers of artists on tour. I'm seeing the pie is getting bigger and artists are diversifying."

    Where are you seeing this? I am not seeing it. There seems to be a minor upswing in income on the second level (below the mega acts), but again seems to be more related to increased venue ticket prices, and not in any other way.

    I am not seeing anything that suggests indie acts are driving live venue income. It seems to be top down. Do you have anything (aside from links to Techdirt) that supports your claims?

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