Biden Executive Order Will Try To Address Some 'Right To Repair' Harms

from the you-don't-own-what-you-buy dept

Back in 2015, frustration at John Deere's ham-fisted repair restrictions and draconian tractor DRM helped birth a grassroots tech movement dubbed "right to repair." The company's crackdown on "unauthorized repairs" turned countless ordinary citizens into technology policy activists, after onerous restrictions not only significantly drove up repair costs, but forced owners to often haul their equipment hundreds or thousands of miles to an authorized repair location.

John Deere's multi-year promise to do a better job providing access to tools, documentation, and repair options simply never materialized. And of course John Deere is just one of numerous companies engaged in this kind of behavior across numerous sectors, driving major public support for proposed legislation in more than a dozen states that would put a major dent in technology repair monopolies.

In a small win for farmers and right to repair advocates, Biden is apparently planning to include some right to repair mandates in an upcoming executive order on competition. The order itself will urge the FTC to craft tighter rules to address the problem:

"U.S. President Joe Biden wants the Federal Trade Commission to limit the ability of farm equipment manufacturers to restrict tractor owners from using independent repair shops or complete some repairs on their own, a source briefed on the matter told Reuters Tuesday. Biden's planned executive order on competition, expected to be released in the coming days, will encourage the FTC to address the issue, the source said. Some tractor manufacturers like Deere & Co use proprietary repair tools and software to prevent third parties from performing some repairs. Deere and the FTC did not immediately comment.

The problem is that the FTC's rule creation and enforcement authority is arguably narrow under the FTC Act (not to mention limited by funding and staffing constraints). Most of the agency's enforcement authority rests on whether something is clearly "unfair and deceptive." But most repair monopolies, like Apple, obfuscate their greed by insisting onerous repair restrictions are necessary to protect consumer safety and security. Ideally you'd prefer clear and well crafted state and federal laws, but companies like Apple have worked overtime to insist such legislation would also harm the public.

In 2017, Apple insisted that passing a right to repair law in Nebraska would turn the state into a "mecca for hackers." More recently, the auto industry tried to claim that expanding Massachusetts' existing consumer tech law, to make sure that independent garages could access tools and diagnostic gear, would result in a "boom in sexual predators." Sony, Microsoft, and others eager to monopolize repair options for their game consoles can routinely be found making the same or similar arguments about how better consumer protection would create a parade of unforeseen horribles.

But a recent bipartisan FTC report found that the majority of the claims coming from companies like Apple were false (the company bullies independent repair shop owners to protect revenues, not out of some broad altruism). The report went on to note that stricter state and federal laws and tougher antitrust enforcement would go a long way toward addressing this kind of behavior. In other words, even the FTC acknowledges it's going to take more than just an EO punting the problem to the FTC if right to repair reform is to be taken seriously.

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Filed Under: copyright, drm, executive order, ftc, joe biden, right to repair, unauthorized repairs


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  • icon
    ECA (profile), 7 Jul 2021 @ 9:49am

    Long ago, far away.(from logic)

    WE HAD a right to repair.
    WE could find parts.
    Products released, had Extra addons that we could get Forever. And now you cant find them.

    Long ago we made some small changes to how things SHOULD be. But the gov. decided not to enforce them. Like your SS card # was Never supposed to be used for Identification. The race and gender equality laws. Fair wages.

    Allot of this has gone on the wayside, or been removed. Great way to make things Easy to point at, and Blame for things that WERE FIX in the past.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 7 Jul 2021 @ 11:15am

      Re: Long ago, far away.(from logic)

      WE HAD a right to repair. WE could find parts. Products released, had Extra addons that we could get Forever.

      Don't forget that products came with detailed repair manuals and schematics. 50 years ago, nobody would've bought a car or TV that they couldn't (in theory) repair.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        ECA (profile), 7 Jul 2021 @ 5:56pm

        Re: Re: Long ago, far away.(from logic)

        I was the one 50 years ago, that tore my mothers Vacuum aparts to find out Why the beater head wasnt working. CLEANED IT, and put it back together(hairs in the end caps, took hours to cut it all out). Mom, didnt know until she used it.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 7 Jul 2021 @ 10:18am

    It should be obvious to any decently informed adult that corporations don't do anything out of altruism. Everything is always about money in some way. The very closest to altruism they can get is giving the appearance of altruism when it's profitable to do so.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 7 Jul 2021 @ 10:36am

    Great, just what we need...

    An executive order that can be torn up and thrown out rather then an actual law that is much, much harder to get rid of.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 7 Jul 2021 @ 10:57am

    When companies make justifications like:

    by insisting onerous repair restrictions are necessary to protect consumer safety and security.

    would result in a "boom in sexual predators."

    They are just emulating the politicians methods for getting laws passed, and all too often the non-association between problems works.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Federico (profile), 7 Jul 2021 @ 12:28pm

    Rules of practice and "unfair method of competition"

    It can't be a coincidence that this comes out few days after the first meeting of the FTC where major decisions were taken https://www.politico.com/news/2021/07/01/ftc-lina-khan-antitrust-chair-497764 :

    One of the most important actions Thursday — a project of Democratic Commissioner Rebecca Kelly Slaughter — sets the stage for a return to active rulemaking. [...]
    Khan also said the FTC would probably consider writing its own definition of what conduct amounts to an “unfair method of competition” — an idea that could allow the agency to sue businesses for bad behavior not covered by traditional antitrust law.

    https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/federal_register_notices/2021/07/rules_of_practice_ parts_0_and_1_proposed_text.pdf

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    anon, 7 Jul 2021 @ 1:19pm

    I wonder

    If congress doesn't fix the DMCA law, this is just grandstanding by an impotent politician.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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